Color Me Rad at The Reptile Zoo

We knew our visitors to The Reptile Zoo were smart, but how could we have guessed they were soo creative too! A couple months ago we added a coloring station to the hands-on fun at The Reptile Zoo and since then we have been amazed by the rad art our guests have made. We provide the template, a playful cartoon illustration of Thelma & Louise one of the two-headed snake, but they provide the style! Some take the approach of Picasso, some Warhol, some Pollock, and some have a style all their own. These pieces of art are so unique we decided to make our own virtual museum to showcase their talents. Visit www. Facebook.com/TheReptileZoo to check out our fan art or better yet stop by The Reptile Zoo in person and make your own art to add to the collection!

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Bullfrog Comparisons

At first glance it may seem like the only difference between an American Bullfrog and an African Bullfrog is their country of origin, but when you look close that all changes.

The American Bullfrog is characterized by its spotted green and brown coloration, large eardrums, long "fingers" and usually erect posture. These frogs are very common and can be found throughout the United States and Canada and when undisturbed in ponds love to make a large croaking noise to attract a female companion.

 
The American Bullfrog can grow on average to be about 7 to 10 inches in length. Studies show the bullfrog preys on any animal it can overpower and stuff down its throat. This characteristic is common to the American and African Bullfrog who are both agressive eaters digesting prey including rodents, small turtles, snakes, frogs (including bullfrogs), birds, and bats, as well as the many invertebrates, such as insects, which are the usual diet of frogs.


(video courtesy of http://www.youtube.com/KoreanFrogMania)

 

As you can see although both animals may love to eat the African Bullfrog, also commonly called Pixie Frog, looks more like the American Bullfrog's fat cousin. By weight the American Bullfrog usually grows to about 1 lb while the African Bullfrog can weigh a whopping 4+ lbs! The coloration of these animals are also quite different. Pixie Frogs love to live in the marshes where they burrow down covering their bright yellow belly while American Bullfrogs enjoy hop near the rivers edge.

Next time you are in The Reptile Zoo be sure to visit both our American and African Bullfrogs to see if you can tell the difference yourself!

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USARK Legal Action Against FWS Constrictor Rule

Approximately three months have passed since U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) took the unprecedented action of adding four constricting snakes to the Injurious Wildlife list of the Lacey Act. Never before have animals widely held by the American public been listed. Originally FWS suggested the addition of all of Boa, Python and Eunectes. The list was whittled down to nine constricting snakes after the highly controversial “Risk Assessment” was published by Gordon Rodda and Robert Reed of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The final rule was announced in January 2012. USARK was able to block five of the nine proposed snakes by taking dynamic action against the rule. Never before had a Injurious Wildlife listing been challenged or blocked. Nevertheless, the final rule was enacted March 23rd 2012 with four constricting snakes.

U.S. Geological Survey

From the very beginning of this process USARK has been very careful to lay the groundwork and establish the public record that would afford us the ability to take legal action if necessary. Scientists from all over the world have criticized the sloppy and speculative work used by FWS to justify Lacey Act listing. In 2010 USARK filed a formal challenge of the USGS “Risk Assessment” under the Information Quality Act. In 2011 Georgetown Economic Services (GES) published “The Modern Reptile Industry”, an independent and comprehensive economic survey that included the impact that a Lacey Act listing was likely to have on legitimate business interests. The GES report demonstrated how the listing could impact as much as $104 million in trade annually. USARK built a clear and convincing case that FWS was potentially arbitrary and capricious in their zeal for a listing.

USARK and its counsel are carefully reviewing their legal options for addressing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s unwarranted listing of four constricting snakes, including Burmese pythons, on the Lacey Act’s Injurious Wildlife list. We believe the listing decision was precipitous, unsupported by the best available science, and poor policy. USARK is also concerned about the five other species of snakes, including Boa constrictor, that FWS has deferred addressing.

High quality captive bred Burmese python morphs

We believe FWS has exceeded its Lacey Act authority in terms of the breadth of the restrictions placed on the four listed species. The organization will continue to develop its legal theories and develop a plan for addressing the industry’s legitimate concerns with the proposed and final rules.

These legal maneuvers are not inexpensive, and will be even more costly if it is necessary to file a federal lawsuit. Our goal is to raise $250,000 between now and the end of the year. This is only a start. If we file a lawsuit it could easily require twice that amount. FWS doesn’t think that the Reptile Nation is capable of fielding a serious legal challenge to their arbitrary Lacey Act listing. They don’t think we can raise the money. We have waited until our legal team gave us the word that they felt we have a strong and clear course of action to follow. Now is the time for the Reptile Nation to stand up and take back what is ours!

Please use PayPal to donation@usark.org. Please put “LAW” in the comment or note area; or you can mail a check to: USARK, PO Box 279, Grandy, NC 27939. Please put “LAW” in the memo line.

donate

 

This blog has been shared directly from http://usark.org/action-alert/usark-legal-action-against-fws-constrictor-rule/

The United States Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK) is a registered non-profit organization duly incorporated in the state of North Carolina. We are advocates for the practice of Herpetoculture; the non-traditional agricultural pursuit of farming high quality captive bred reptiles & amphibians for conservation projects, zoos, museums, research facilities, education, entertainment and pets. We are dedicated to conservation through captive propagation, and espouse the ideal of, “Preserving Reptiles & Amphibians for Our Future”. We endorse a ‘Keepers Code of Ethics’. Our members are veterinarians, researchers, breeders, manufacturers, feed producers, hobbyists and pet owners; collectively known as the Reptile Nation. Our membership accounts for annual trade revenues of $1.4 billion in the US. USARK is the only advocate of the conservation, responsible ownership and trade of reptiles and amphibians as a #1 priority with no conflicting interests.

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Attack of the Giant Chameleon at The Reptile Zoo

 

This big guy is one of the largest species of chameleon and has recently joined us in The Reptile Zoo. His diet mainly consists of roaches with their legs removed and lives above the photobooth. He is a fully grown adult, and is waiting for you to visit him!

 

 

As commonly known, chameleons can change their colors based on their mood. When he isn’t feeling too great or is scared he can change himself to dull colors such as light and dark browns, and when happy he changes to brighter colors such as green, blue and yellow.

 

He loves climbing up vines and branches (or really anything he can find to climb on) and if you offer him food he’ll actually eat it straight out of your hand using his long sticky tongue to get it from you. 

 

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Monsters at The Reptile Zoo!

 Our Beaded Lizards & Gila Monster, newly added exhibit in our REPTILE ZOO!  Are the only two venomous lizard species in the world.  Capable of inflicting a very painful bite!  I can personally vouch for that fact.  They both have  Bull dog like bites, they grab on & it is nearly impossible to get them to release the extreme presure their jaws  exert.

 The Beaded lizard & Gila Monster are combined into the lizard family known by the scientific name Helodermatid.  The scientific name of the Beaded lizard is Heloderma horridum sp. The Gila Monster is known as Heloderma suspectum sp.  The sp. means that each species has at least 2 or more subspecies.

    These lizards are very unusual because of their skin texture.  Both have beadlike looking scales, called osteoderms (bony skin).  These bony scales make these lizards nearly indestructible.  Along with their formidable bite, they are not an animal to trifle with, with out years of experience, as is true with all venomous reptiles.  Luckily both lizards are completely PROTECTED in every state and country they are native to.

    They both have good daytime vision and very keen hearing.  These lizards can also sense an oncoming intruder by detecting minute vibrations in the ground.  These keen senses are a must for survival, considering these animals are slow travelers and incapable of any fast sprints.  Slow & awkward they have another defense, and that is they spend about 90% of their life underground.  Coming out in the spring to forage for food and breed.

    They feed almost exclusively on the contents of other animals nests and underground borrows, such as bird eggs & offspring, rodents, snake & lizard eggs, etc.  Even though they are so clumsy and slow, both are excellent climbers.

    The heloderms range I’ll break down seperately.  Beaded lizards range from southern Sonora Mexico south along the west coast of mainland Mexico into eastern Guatamala in Central America.  On the other hand Gia Monsters are native mostly to southern Arizona, s.w. New Mexico, extreme s.e. California, southern Nevada, and s.w. Utah in the U.S. southward into southern Sonora, Mexico.  So far they are absent from Baja, Mexico and the small islands of the Sea of Cortez.

     Reproduction in Gila Monsters takes place in the spring, with egg clutches numbering 2 to 12, after a gestation period of 25 days.  In captivity Beaded Lizards lay 2 to 22 egg clutches, averages of 6 to 10 eggs are more common.

     My foremost project here at the REPTILE ZOO is reproducing the Beaded Lizards.  So come on in and see how we’re progressing with our breeding colony of 5 specimens! 

      Craig Tauchman    May 6,2012

 

 

 

 

 

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Photos for a Cause

Does your reptile love the camera? Do you love the camera?

Jurassic Parties, The Reptile Zoo and Prehistoric Pets would like to invite you to use your photography skills to support the United States Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK) A conservation, education and advocacy organization dedicated to protecting reptiles & amphibians for our future.

 

USARK represents and aims to protect the rights of the reptile community in legal hearings from Washington D.C. across the United States.For those not familiar with reptiles photos sometimes speak louder than words creating an instant connection with the viewer. USARK is seeking photos for various materials and presentations to continue accurately representation of their temperament and the thousands who love and care for them

 

 

The three categories of pictures requested are:

1) Positive, safe interactions between humans and reptiles;

 

2) Show us your set ups! Reptiles in great, well designed, SAFE, clean, and appropriate enclosures;

 

 

 

3) Reptiles in their natural environments.

Please send your photos to erika@silverdogs.com with a permission letter. (We have included a basic sample letter below) If you have any specific restrictions on your permission please include them in this letter and they will be honored by USARK. No photos provided by members will be used in any merchandise or offered for sale.

Copyright Holder

Name:

Address:

Phone:

Email:

 

I, _____________________________ give the United States Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK)

permission for the unlimited use of the attached photograph(s) on its website, brochures, pamphlets and educational materials.

 

 

For more information visit www.USARK.org

The US Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK) is a science and education based advocacy for the responsible private ownership of, and trade in reptiles. We endorse caging standards, sound husbandry, escape prevention protocols, and an integrated approach to vital conservation issues. Our goal is to facilitate cooperation between government agencies, the scientific community, and the private sector in order to produce policy proposals that will effectively address important husbandry and conservation issues. The health of these animals, public safety, and maintaining ecological integrity are our primary concerns.

This post has been shared from the Official USARK Facebook page. (https://www.facebook.com/pages/USARK-United-States-Association-of-Reptile-Keepers/93475517723)

 

 

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Lets See How They Grow! Gator Edition

Since the opening of The Reptile Zoo we have been lucky enough to add 4 American Alligators of various sizes to our collection. The first gators to become part of The Reptile Zoo family were Gomer and Pyle who were each two years old and about 2 feet long. 

Next we welcomed Darthgator a five year old 4 foot male gator. Since coming to The Reptile Zoo Gomer and Pyle have grown to almost the same size as Darthgator when he first arrived. Growth in American Alligators is an indicator that the animals are in the correct habitat and maintaining a healthy diet. Here at The Reptile Zoo our gator friends like to each chicken and lots of it. 

Gomer and Pyle prefer chicken legs while Darthgator has moved on to full chicken breasts. Which is represented in Darthgator's growth to reach at least 6 feet in length with an impressive girth.

A couple months ago our final gator addition came in the smallest package, Davey a petit yearling American Alligator. Davey is still eating goldfish, but is just about large enough to move up to a larger prey soon!

Now that you have seen the before and after photos you'll have to come to The Reptile Zoo and visit these growing giants!

 

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Celebrate Summer with Jurassic Parties Schools Out Chill Out Giveaway

Here at The Reptile Zoo our jurassic party animals are totally cold blooded so when the temperature outside goes up they have to find creative ways to cool down. Since our fans are all pretty cool Southern California residents our prehistoric pets want to see your favorite ways to beat the heat. Share a photo of how you plan to chill out this summer on the Jurassic Parties Facebook Fan Page then enter to win a pair of tickets to Frozen Planet in Concert at the Hollywood Bowl for Saturday, July 7th at 8pm.


Following the success of Planet Earth Live, the world premiere of Frozen Planet in Concert comes to the Bowl’s big screen in the latest co-production of the BBC and Discovery Channel. The ultimate portrait of Earth’s last great wilderness, the Polar Regions, will be presented with stunning imagery with live orchestral accompaniment by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and conducted by composer George Fenton.


Frozen Planet in Concert presented by the LA PHIL will only be in concert at the Hollywood Bowl on Friday and Saturday July 6-7 at 8pm and it is sure to be an event you will not want to miss. For tickets and information, visit HollywoodBowl.com.

Jurassic Parties Schools Out Chill Out winner will be randomly chosen to receive two (2) tickets for Saturday July 7 at 8 PM to Frozen Planet Live in Concert at the Hollywood Bowl. To be eligible to win entrants must be a fan of Jurassic Parties at www.Facebook.com/JurassicParties and complete the contest form at www.JurassicParties.com/prize