Python Ban: The Answers to Living Under the Lacey Act

 

 

Prehistoric Pets has long worked with a wide variety of species of large constrictors, over a span of many years. During that time, we have come to an intimate understanding of the animals we have worked with, their temperature and environmental needs, personalities, reproductive and feeding capabilities. With this background and some additional research it becomes clear the animals recently added to the Lacey act are neither capable of living outside of their current establishment in the Everglades or pose a reasonable threat to humans.

Today the listing of of 4 large constricting snake species as injurious under the Lacey Act officially goes into effect. At Prehistoric Pets we have had many customers, friends, and fans who have been calling in to find out exactly what this means to them. To provide a clear answer to the most commonly asked questions, today’s blog will highlight the most important changes with links to the government agencies where further resources and information can be found.

 

 

Q: When is the rule in effect?

A: Today, March 23, 2012

 

Q: What animals are included?

A:  Burmese Python, North African Python, Southern African Python, Yellow Anaconda, their eggs and hybrids.

 

Q: What does the listing entail?

A: No importation or interstate transport of the included animals.

 

Q: Is it still legal to own, breed, and display these animals?

A: Yes, if there are no further restrictions in your area of residence, these animals may still be kept for pets, display, and breeding, but at no point can move across state lines.

 

Q: If I move to another state can I bring my listed pet?

A: No. There is absolutely no interstate transport of the 4 listed species within the United States for personal purposes. All interstate transport of the listed species will result in penalty under the Lacey Act.

 

Q: What options do I have as an owner of one of these animals who is relocating to another state?

A: There are some options as provided by the Department of Fish and Wildlife below.

Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council’s Pet Pathway Toolkit: www.petpathwaytoolkit.com

Habitattitude www.habitattitude.net

 

Q: Can these animals be rescued from out of state?

A: No. Rescues may only care for animals currently within their state.

 

Q: Can these animals be purchased online or at trade shows?

A: Only if their original location is within your state. For example to purchase a Burmese python from Prehistoric Pets you must live within the state of California. If you live in the state of Colorado you will be unable to purchase a Burmese python from Prehistoric Pets and instead must locate a Colorado based breeder.

 

Q: Can these animals be exported out of the country?

A: Yes, if there are no US stops during transport. For example if a shipment from Los Angeles International Airport is headed to London’s Heathrow International Airport the flight cannot make a stop at John F Kennedy International Airport, this would be considered interstate transport between California and New York and furthermore a violation of the Lacey Act. NOTE: This listing also adds these animals in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) listing requiring CITES export permits.

 

Q: Are there any exceptions to the ban on importation or interstate transport?

A: There are only 4 exceptions to this rule which all must receive authorized and permitted approval BEFORE transport. These exceptions are medical (not veterinary), scientific, zoological, and education.

 

Q: Can I perform educational presentations outside of my state?

A: Yes, if the correct permitting requirements completed BEFORE transport. See below. NOTE: Please allow at least 60 days for permit processing.

 

Q: What steps are required to meet permitting requirements?

A:            1. Application Form 3-200-42 (www.fws.gov/forms/3-200-42.pdf)

                2. PERMANENT Housing in Double Escape-Proof Containment at ALL TIMES

               
Q: What does PERMANENT Housing in Double Escape-Proof Containment mean?

A: Under permit requirements all applied animals, including their offspring, must be kept in double escape-proof containment at ALL TIMES. Double escape-proof containment, just as it sounds, is defined as housing the animal in a secured area, within another equally as secured area. In regular housing this would mean in a locked cage within a locked room/building. During transport this would mean in a container within a larger secured container. If the animal is to be handled during an educational presentation it must be within a room with a closed door, which is within another room with a closed door. NOTE: This housing requirement is not only required during the permitted activity but for the life of the animal AND ALL OFFSPRING.

 

Q: What are the penalties for violating the Lacey Act?

A.   “Violations of the Lacey Act provisions may be prosecuted through either civil or criminal enforcement actions.  With respect to potential criminal penalties, a two-tiered penalty scheme exists, creating both misdemeanor and felony offenses, distinguished by a defendant’s knowledge of the underlying law.  For a Lacey Act violation to be a felony, the defendant must have knowingly imported or exported fish or wildlife or plants in violation an underlying law or regulation, or knowingly engaged in conduct during the offense that involved the sale or purchase of, the offer for sale or purchase of, or the intent to sell or purchase plants or wildlife with a market value of over $350 knowing that the fish or wildlife or plants were taken, possessed, transported or sold in violation of an underlying law or regulation.  A misdemeanor penalty requires that the defendant “in the exercise of due care” should have known the fish or wildlife or plants were taken, possessed, transported, or sold in violation of an underlying law or regulation. “ 

“Felony criminal sanctions are provided for violations involving imports or exports, or violations of a commercial nature in which the value of the wildlife is in excess of $350. A misdemeanor violation was established, with a fine of up to $10,000 and imprisonment of up to 1 year, or both. Civil penalties up to $10,000 were provided. However, the Criminal Fines Improvement Act of 1987 increased the fines under the Lacey Act for misdemeanors to a maximum of $100,000 for individuals and $200,000 for organizations. Maximum fines for felonies were increased to $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for organizations.

Those enforcing the Act are authorized to carry firearms, make qualified warrantless arrests for felony and misdemeanor violations of any law of the U.S. when enforcing the Act, search and seize under Attorney General guidelines, issue subpoenas and warrants, inspect vessels, vehicles, aircraft, packages, crates, and containers on arrival in the United States from outside the United States or prior to departure from the United States.” 

 

Sources:

http://www.fws.gov/home/feature/2012/pdfs/ImplicationsoftheInjuriouslistingforthe4constrictorsnakes.pdf

http://www.fws.gov/laws/lawsdigest/LACEY.HTML

http://www.fws.gov/home/feature/2012/pdfs/FoursnakesQsAs11612.pdf

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CEsQFjAE&url=http://www.fs.fed.us/global/aboutus/policy/tt/illegal_logging/Lacey_Act_amendments_public_summary.doc&ei=Ie9sT-mIKKSxsgLOiK2bBg&usg=AFQjCNGZjhxeb3UmdQ1KqzxzaZzgk-E0kw

 

 

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Python Ban: The Special Interest Argument

 

 

Prehistoric Pets has long worked with a wide variety of species of large constrictors, over a span of many years. During that time, we have come to an intimate understanding of the animals we have worked with, their temperature and environmental needs, personalities, reproductive and feeding capabilities. With this background and some additional research it becomes clear the animals recently added to the Lacey act are neither capable of living outside of their current establishment in the Everglades or pose a reasonable threat to humans.

We’ve compiled just some of the facts we’ve found within the documentation supposedly backing this faulty legislation. We urge you to read these excerpts, examine the sources and develop your own opinion on the subject, but please please do not rely on sensationalized images and articles with an underlying agenda. Today we will cover the special interest argument examining where the support and attack on this legislation is really coming from.

 

 

SPECIAL INTREST ARGUMENT

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The U.S. Association of Reptile Keepers spent $213,202 on lobbying since 2009, as the ban was being considered, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks political spending.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sfl-obama-administration-to-make-major-burmese-python-announcement-20120116,0,2260910.story

Democratic Senator Michael Bennet from Colorado received $109,520 from interest groups, including the Humane Society of the United States, to support of HR 2811 along with $62,204  to Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer. Then received the same amount again in support of HR669 for a total of $343,448 to these 2 Senators alone.

http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-h2811/money

http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-h669/money

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The Way Washington Works

Here’s a timeline.

June 2006: The South Florida Water Management District petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) requesting the listing of Burmese pythons as injurious under the Lacey Act, a federal law that regulates trade in wildlife.

January 2008FWS published a Notice of Inquiry in the Federal Register asking the public for comments on several large constrictor snakes.

July 2009U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee about the dangers posed by large constricting snakes to Florida’s ecosystems, unveiling the skin of a 17-foot Burmese python perhaps shed in the Everglades. 

October 2009The U.S. Geological Survey issued a science-based report that identifies nine species of large, constricting snakes as posing a medium or high risk as invasive species in the United States.

March 2010FWS issued a proposed rule to list nine large constrictor snakes as injurious under the Lacey Act.

January 2011: Open Secrets, a website that discloses federal lobbying expenditures, announced that the U.S. Association of Reptile Keepers spent $120,000 lobbying against the FWS rule. USARK submitted a report saying that banning the trade in these species would cost the industry $100 million–an utterly absurd figure. 

March 2011: The White House Office of Management and Budget/Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs received the final rule from FWS. (This White House agency's review process is usually 90 days, yet the rule was held up for 10 months.)

January 2012: Salazar makes the announcement covering only the four species.

 

http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2012/01/constrictor-snake-news.html

Missing from timeline:

Democratic Senator Michael Bennet from Colorado received $109,520 from interest groups, including the Humane Society of the United States, to support of HR 2811 along with $62,204  to Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer. Then received the same amount again in support of HR669 for a total of $343,448 to these 2 Senators alone.

http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-h2811/money

http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-h669/money

The Information Quality Act governs the standard of quality of information used to substantiate a federal rule making such as the Constrictor Rule. Because, at the behest of USARK, it was confirmed from scientists round the world that the USGS Constrictor Report was NOT the kind of quality scientific work to base policy or legislative changes on, USARK filed a formal challenge in 2010 of the Constrictor Report in the form of a Request for Correction of the myriad of errors, misstatements and inconsistencies within the document. USGS responded that they were not held to information quality standards under the IQA because their "Grey" paper was NOT deemed at the time of publication to be a "Highly Influential" document; meaning that their estimate of the economic impact of the rule it was supporting fell below the $100 million threshold that constitutes a major rule. Unfortunately for them USARK commissioned Georgetown Economic Services to do a comprehensive economic assessment of the reptile industry. They researched the entire industry and determined that the rule, in fact, reached beyond the threshold to approximately $104 million. This put the entire rule making process in jeopardy, because now USGS and FWS could be held to account in a federal courtroom for bypassing information quality standards under IQA. After USARK proved that this would indeed fall into major rule territory, White House oversight officials appeared ready to bury the rule.... Until HSUS, The Nature Conservancy and Defenders of Wildlife pressured Florida politicians to ask Obama to push rule through. Then government did what it always does, it compromised. They chose 4 snakes that would not carry the economic impact constituting a major rule and enacted this limited version avoiding the mandatory integrity in science demanded by going after all 9.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/USARK-United-States-Association-of-Reptile-Keepers/93475517723

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Special Interests and Their Brand of Snake Oil

Hundreds of thousands of the animals have been imported into the country in recent years, and there’s almost never a good outcome for these hapless creatures. 

http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2011/09/constrictor-snakes.html

It’s easy to rail at Washington, and in so many cases, it’s the right response. But there’s more to the story. Rail at the special interests that are thwarting the public good. And take action to turn it around. It’s up to us to provide a counterweight and to restore some good sense and sound policies. If we leave the playing field to the reptile dealers, the puppy millers, the NRA and so many other selfish interests, the animals won’t stand a chance.

http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2011/09/constrictor-snakes.html


Animal Protection Priorities – 111th Congress

Pythons – S. 373 / H.R. 2811 – To amend the Lacey Act to add pythons to the list of injurious species prohibited from interstate commerce and importation.  Leaders:  Sen. Bill Nelson / Rep. Meek  House Judiciary Committee markup of H.R. 2811 held on 7/29/09, narrowing bill to Burmese pythons and Rock pythons.   Hearing on S. 373 held on 7/8/09 in EPW Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. 

Nonnative Wildlife Invasion Prevention Act – H.R. 669 – To prevent the introduction and establishment in the U.S. of nonnative wildlife species that may hurt the economy, environment, human health, or native wildlife. Leader:  Rep. Bordallo  Hearing held on 3/23/09 in House Subcommittee on Insular Affairs, Oceans, and Wildlife

http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/pdfs/legislation/111th-congress-humane-agenda-1.pdf

Our organizations, representing millions of constituents across the country, come together in support of H.R. 669, the Nonnative Wildlife Invasion Prevention Act. We applaud Congresswoman Madeleine Bordallo for her leadership in introducing this bill, and express our appreciation to the 25 current cosponsors.

http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/pdfs/wildlife/exotics/hr_669_statement_042309.pdf

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation's largest animal protection organization — backed by 10.5 million Americans, or one of every 30. For more than a half-century, The HSUS has been fighting for the protection of all animals through advocacy, education and hands-on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty — On the web at humanesociety.org. 

http://www.humanesociety.org/news/press_releases/2009/01/bill_to_address_exotic_animal_importation_introduced_012709.html

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Live Reptile Trade: The reptile trade puts human health, the environment, and the animals at risk

The recent explosion in the popularity of pet reptiles—the number topped 13 million in 2009, according to the American Pet Products Association—is bad news for people, reptiles, and the environment.

http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/exotic_pets/facts/reptile_trade.html

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RED ALERT: STOP HR511 Python BAN TODAY!

This morning we learned from USARK (United States Association of Reptile Keepers) that Congressman Tom Rooney (R-FL) had introduced HR511, a bill to ammend the Lacey Act (title 18) to prohibit the importation of 9 species of constricting snakes, to the US House of Representatives. Below is the official post from USARK with details on how you can get involved to help protect our jobs, passions, and pets.

 

HR 511, a bill to amend title 18, United States Code, to prohibit the importation of various injurious species of constrictor snakes; Indian python, Python molurus, including the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus; reticulated python, Broghammerus reticulatus; Northern African python,Python sebae; Southern African python, Python natalensis; Boa constrictor; yellow anaconda, Eunectes notaeus; DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Eunectes deschauenseei; green anaconda, Eunectes murinus; and the Beni anaconda, Eunectes beniensis, in the US House of Representatives, was introduced January 26, 2011 by Congressman Tom Rooney (R-FL) . 

Congressman Rooney has taken action to move HR 511! This bill seeks to add 9 constricting snakes to the Injurious Wildlife List of the Lacey Act. HR 511 has been scheduled for a Markup Hearing before the US House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday February 28, 2012 at 10:00 AM EST.

http://judiciary.house.gov/hearings/markups112.html

>>There is very little time to voice opposition to this bill that could devistate the Reptile Community. Please participate in the USARK Call In Campaign TODAY!<<

PHONE CAMPAIGN:

Talking Points:

Will destroy thousands of jobs and small family businesses; $104 million annual economic impact.
Criminalize the actions of over 1 million American Citizens; Lacey Act felons.
Federal action to address a localized problem in South Florida is unnecessary; the State of Florida and US Fish & Wildlife have already taken draconian measures.
Underlying science has been criticized by scientists from around the world.
Creates a massive animal welfare problem, potentially displacing millions of animals.

Key Members of House Judiciary Committee:

Lamar Smith (R-TX)- 202-225-4236
Sensenbrenner (R-WI)- 202-225-5101
Coble (R-NC)- 202-225-3065
Issa (R-CA)- 202-225-3906
Gohmert (R-TX)- 202-225-3035
Chaffetz (R-UT)- 202-225-7751
Gowdy (R-SC)- 202-225-6030
Poe (R-TX)- 202-225-6565
Goodlatte (R-VA)- 202-225-5431

DO IT NOW!!!

SHARE SHARE SHARE!!!

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Oh My Michelle!

 Prehistoric Pets has been a family owned business for many years and all the associate have also become like a family.  You have been introduced to old and new faces throughout the years.  Today we bring you newest newbie face, Michelle Rodruiguez!

Michelle has been interested in reptiles pretty much her entire life, but in the past 2 or 3 years she picked up the hobby seriously.  Now proud owners of SEVERAL reptiles, Michelle and her children have their own reptile zoo at home!  With 2 Ball Pythons "Vixen" and "Kazaz", a Crested Gecko "Lola", a Beardie "Firecracker" and a Tarantula named "Freak", Michelle is definitely experienced with all sorts of different reptile species.   She says some of her favorite reptiles are Ball Pythons and Dum's, which is also where she says her expertise, is based.  Michelle also shared with us her ABSOLUTE favorite reptile EVER, the Gaboon Vipers!  When asked what was it that made her so interested in THAT particular snake, she replied, "They're pattern is SO gorgeous and they have the highest venom yield of any venomous snake in the world!.... It's so intriguing to see such a beautiful and powerfully venomous snake."  Nice choice there Michelle =D.

Michelle plays "Mimic" with our baby Anaconda <3  "GGRRAAWWRRR"

Here at Prehistoric Pets, Michelle is one of the many bright faces you see caring for all our retail animals and assisting customers through the store.  “Being able to help and educate new and experienced herpers is one of my favorite things” she said when asked about what she enjoys most when working at Prehistoric Pets.   She specializes in ball pythons and Dum's and hopes to own more reptiles in the future.  On top of being a great new employee, Michelle keeps up spirits here at the shop.  Our official “Mother Hen” can smell a bad mood a mile away and crushes it with a joke and a hug X-D.  Welcome to the Family Michelle! 

^O^…………Priscilla

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Python Ban: The Economic Argument

Prehistoric Pets has long worked with a wide variety of species of large constrictors, over a span of many years. During that time, we have come to an intimate understanding of the animals we have worked with, their temperature and environmental needs, personalities, reproductive and feeding capabilities. With this background and some additional research it becomes clear the animals recently added to the Lacey act are neither capable of living outside of their current establishment in the Everglades or pose a reasonable threat to humans. We’ve compiled just some of the facts we’ve found within the documentation supposedly backing this faulty legislation.

We urge you to read these excerpts, examine the sources and develop your own opinion on the subject, but please please do not rely on sensationalized images and articles with an underlying agenda. Today we will cover the economic argument that is so often misconstrued and sensationalized by comparing annual costs to the cost over time.

 

 

ECONOMIC ARGUMENT

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“Unfortunately, when it came to weighing the economic interests of these few breeders against the enormous economic and ecological damage these snakes can cause, the Administration was sold a bottle of snake oil.” –Dr. Bruce Stein of the National Wildlife Federation

National Environmental Coalition on Invasive Species

 

Actual Facts: From 2005-2012 the “enormous” economic damage to the US Fish and Wildlife Service was about $6 million or $720,000-$850,000 annually. The estimated loss by these “few breeders” will be $10.7 million - $21.8 million annually by the current listing of just 3 species.Fish and Wildlife Services: Economic Impact

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Question 19: Did you determine if there will be economic or environmental impacts if these species are listed under the Lacey Act?

The Service’s Division of Economics reviewed all of the comments related to the economic impact of the proposed rule and updated the economic analysis. The total annual decrease in economic output if all of the nine large constrictors were listed as injurious under the Lacey Act is estimated to range from $42.0 to $86.2 million.[1] For four species, the decrease in economic output is estimated to be $10.7 to 21.8 million. These estimates assume that consumers will not increase their purchases of other species in response to the unavailability of the listed species. If consumers do switch to other species, the impact on economic output would be reduced.

State and Federal agencies have expended millions of public dollars [2] to address the threats posed by pythons in the Everglades If the spread of these species is not controlled, we anticipate that State and Federal agencies would need to spend even more money to address the threats posed in other areas of the United States. These costly control measures could be reduced or prevented by this listing under the Lacey Act.

Fish and Wildlife Services: Four Snakes Q&A

 

[1] Unfortunately for them USARK commissioned Georgetown Economic Services to do a comprehensive economic assessment of the reptile industry. They researched the entire industry and determined that the rule, in fact, reached beyond the threshold to approximately $104 million. USARK Facebook

[2] From 2005-2012 US Fish and Wildlife Service spent $6 million [$720,000-$850,000 ANNUALLY] Estimated loss in industry [9 species $42 million -$104 million ANNUALLY] [4 species minimum $10.7 million - $21.8 million ANNUALLY] Fish and Wildlife Services: Economic Impact

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Question 22: Will the pet industry lose revenue and jobs as a result of this rule?

The Service’s Division of Economics reviewed all of the public comments related to the economic impact of the proposed rule that were submitted during the two public comment periods and updated the economic analysis. The total ANNUAL DECREASE IN ECONOMIC OUTPUT from listing the four large constrictors as injurious under the Lacey Act is estimated to range from $10.7 TO $21.8 MILLION (assuming that consumers do not switch their purchases to other species). However, the cost of controlling wild populations of large constrictor snakes currently in the United States, through state and Federal control efforts has been ABOUT $6 MILLION THUS FAR. [THAT’S LESS THAN $850,000 ANNUALLY] Failure to stop the spread of these snakes into additional locations would result in significantly increased public expense. This cost could be reduced in Florida -- or prevented in other jurisdictions-- by this listing under the Lacey Act.   Fish and Wildlife Services: Four Snakes Q&A

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How can we afford to regulate animal imports, it’s too expensive?

There will be costs to regulate the trade in exotic animals, but the cost of not acting is even greater. One Florida county reportedly spent $110,000 over two years, and another spends $120,000 annually, to remove nonnative iguanas for example. Cash-strapped governments do not have funds to devote to these efforts. Moreover, once established, eliminating exotic species may be impossible and inhumane. Humane Society of United States: HR669 Facts

Again the Actual Facts: From 2005-2012 the “enormous” economic damage to the US Fish and Wildlife Service was $6 million [$720,000-$850,000 ANNUALLY] The estimated loss by these “few breeders” [9 species $42 million -$104 million ANNUALLY] [4 species minimum $10.7 million - $21.8 million ANNUALLY] Fish and Wildlife Services: Economic Impact

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Listing the snakes as injurious may cost the reptile industry as much as $104 million in domestic sales each year, or $1.2 billion over the next decade, driving some breeders out of business, Kelley Drye & Warren said in a report for its clients. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found the industry would lose $3.6 million to $10.7 million a year and about 200 jobs may disappear.

The U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy, which reviews U.S. regulatory proposals, said in a May 10, 2010, letter to Interior Secretary Ken Salazar that the federal calculations didn’t fully examine the “significant economic impact on a substantial number” of small businesses. Bloomberg News

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The snake sellers argue that it’s a jobs issue—that a federal crackdown on the trade will cost them jobs. They want to preserve their profits and their opportunity to exploit these animals at the expense of so many other people. Is it possible to put a figure on the life of a child killed by a pet snake that should never have been in this country—no mind in someone’s living room in Sumter County, Fla.? And what’s the cost of the death of hundreds of thousands of snakes who suffer and die as a result of this trade? The Interior Department does have an answer on some of the ecological costs. It says it’s spending about $100 million this year to combat invasive species such as the pythons in Florida. Humane Society Blog

In 2011 alone, the Department of the Interior will spend $100 million on prevention, early detection, control and management, research, and more [on ALL known invasive species not just Burmese Pythons] Fish and Wildlife Services: Cost of Invasive Species

Again the Actual Facts: From 2005-2012 the “enormous” economic damage to the US Fish and Wildlife Service was $6 million [$720,000-$850,000 ANNUALLY] The estimated loss by these “few breeders” [9 species $42 million -$104 million ANNUALLY] [4 species minimum $10.7 million - $21.8 million ANNUALLY] Fish and Wildlife Services: Economic Impact

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Recent invasions by imported animal species such as the constrictor snakes, Asian carp, and red lionfish are together costing federal, state, and local governments hundreds of millions of dollars annually in efforts to control them.

National Environmental Coalition on Invasive Species

 Again the Actual Facts: From 2005-2012 the “enormous” economic damage to the US Fish and Wildlife Service was $6 million [$720,000-$850,000 ANNUALLY] The estimated loss by these “few breeders” [9 species $42 million -$104 million ANNUALLY] [4 species minimum $10.7 million - $21.8 million ANNUALLY] Fish and Wildlife Services: Economic Impact

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Ineffective legislation based on fear, sensationalism, and shoddy facts should always be opposed. Unfortunately this addition to the Lacey Act includes all of these features and threatens to dismantle the reptile industry along with all of its educational resources including The Reptile Zoo and Jurassic Parties.

Please sign this petition and share it with your family to show your support of responsible animal ownership, effective and truthful legislation, and the many families who will be detrimentally affected if this becomes law without review.

White House Petition Overturn the Python Ban

 

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We hope you enjoy your stay at our fabulous Anacondaminium!!!

Hey there Prehistoric Pets Fans!!! Anyone who has ever been to our Reptile Zoo can tell you that we have some pretty nifty animals....and their enclosures aren't too shabby either! We have The Crestie Condos, The Alligator/Sulfur Monitor Enclosure, and our new Caiman Lizard Exhibit. But has anyone ever seen the oh-so-cleverly named Anacondaminium? Because it's pretty darn awesome.

This is a picture of the then-unfinished Anacondaminium. Pretty sweet digs, huh? The Green Anacondas we have in here are worth it! Green Anacondas are the heaviest breed of snake in the world! The largest recorded Green Anaconda was around 26 feet long and a whopping 400 pounds! That's huge! Now while these guys probably aren't the first choice pet for just anybody, they are absolutely gorgeous and a really neat animal to get to be around.

 

And here's a picture of our fearless boss and owner of Prehistoric Pets/Jurassic Parties/The Reptile Zoo, Jay Brewer, putting our big girl Sweet Pea into her new house. Welcome Home Sweet Pea!!!

Here at Prehistoric Pets, we encourage EVERYBODY to do alot of research before deciding to buy an animal. Especially something like Sweet Pea! But if you think you're ready to take that plunge, come on in and see what we have for sale! Maybe you'll be lucky enough to catch Jay in the middle of another one of his epic projects!

Later Gator!

Mandysaurus Rex

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Per Your Request!

Hey Guys!

You asked for it!  You got it!  I went on a photo mission this morning to capture all the things you guys wanted to see and here are the results, hope you enjoy them!

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In the beginning..............

All day I have been scanning picture after picture after picture of all the old photos, magazine articles, news paper clippings, ads and accolations that have been written about Jay, the Brewer family, and all of the amazing firsts in Prehistoric Pets & The Reptile Zoo history from the beginning until now! 

Check back soon as I will be posting a ton of pics and putting them into our photo gallery

http://gallery.thereptilezoo.com/Default.aspx?aid=6

You will be in awe at the growth and development aaaaaaaaaaaaaand the changes we here at The Reptile Zoo have made!

Please stand by!

much love

xo.....................savannah

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My Anaconda Don't want none unless..................

Unless she's hungry and luck for us, she wasnt hungry today!  And we all got to hold and play with her!  Even the guy that won our Facebook game contest got in on the action!  He got an in store tour, behind the scenes tour, and his very own photo with our awesomely impressive anaconda!  Soooooooooooooo, what that means to you all is, get in on the contests!  The prizes are once in a lifetime and definately worth it! 

Much love!

xo.....................Savannah

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The Sounds of Silence

In the mornings when I get to the Zoo it is quiet and comfortable the nocturnal animals aren’t quite done with their overnight activities yet and I can walk by every cage and see what they have been doing all night. The snakes are usually crazy active and all I can hear is an occasional hiss or flutter of leaves as something runs through their cage to sound the alarm. “The people are here, the people are here!” is what I imagine them to say as they all move into their hides so that I can’t see how awesome they actually are. Clever little devils that they are The calm in the morning is my favorite time of the day here, it’s when I get to listen and watch, and play with things I probably shouldn’t, haha, kinda like a meditation of sorts. A meditation with nature! That makes my day happy!


Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand then the doors open and the kids come in!!! They are excited and loud and their eyes are wild with energy! I love it! They are like a lightening rod of happiness screaming through the front entrance. Their laughs and squeals are powerful enough to run this whole building for a month I think… Anyways, enough meditation, I feel very lucky that I get to come and touch these wonderful creatures every morning in the silence, but equally as lucky that I get to share that joy with a Zoo full of kids and hopefully, make some sort of difference in their life!
Here they come now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


PS--the last pic is a blurry one of me and my gator in Florida! Just throwing that in becasue I love him, and we might have one here soon! Don't miss out!

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