Miracle Babies

Here at The Reptile Zoo we see every reptile birth as a special miracle, but last week there was no doubt how special our newest addition was!

We were more than surprised to find a TWO-HEADED Reticulated Python with huge potential. As you can see in the photo these little guys are conjoined right at the neck with two completely separate heads and a shared body, very similar to our longtime two-headed mascots Thelma & Louise, but unlike Thelma & Louise who are Texas Ratsnakes these retic newbies have the potential to grow over 200lbs! Just imagine that!

 

 

Snakes, just like humans can have twins which share one egg when developing, but in some cases the two can grow together to create conjoined twins. Just like with humans depending on the area and severity of the connection the two can live a long unhindered life. For example Thelma & Louise have been at The Reptile Zoo for over 10 years, which is long for any ratsnake let alone two-headed!

Now that these two have been out and about getting used to their new environment we are anxiously waiting their next steps into maturity and stability which include their first shed and first meal. These markers will help us guage their health and status, but after already trying to nibble on our fingers we don't think limited appetite will be their problem!

Be sure to keep an eye on the blog to keep up with their progress and even be part of naming these amazingly unique animals. We'll also be updating Facebook with quick glimpses at the newbies!

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Big News for TWINKIE!

When we announced on Twitter and Facebook TWINKIE had big news our fans were quick to guess exactly what was up. TWINKIE has found LOVE and is PREGNANT... well technically gravid, but we couldn't be more excited for her.

We have always been hesitant to allow TWINKIE to breed in case there were any complications in childbirth, but over the past two years we have noticed a steady change in her personality, food cycle, and activity. We cautiously kept watch of these changes hoping she would be able to overcome them without intervention.

Although few would guess it on TWINKIE's normal diet she is offered a medium sized meal every other week, but during this period she has had little to no appetite. Eating a small meal once every couple months. We also noticed she was frequently going into a shedding cycle, which is uncommon for an animal who is not undergowing a large growth spurt. After 2 years of observing this combination, plus her lack of interest in her surroundings when knew it was time to step in. We tried minor changes in late 2012, but with no success. When February came around we knew what just might make all the difference in the world.

 

LOVE! TWINKIE was looking for love! She has always gotten plenty of attention from her adoring fans here at The Reptile Zoo, but as a mature lady she was ready to form a romantic relationship with someone just like her. Although she reached her sexual maturity many years earlier we had never provided an opportunity to breed. As such a unique specimen our staff was fearful the risks outweighed her natural desire to reproduce. But when we saw the negative impacts this decision caused both emotional and physical we carefully considered the best plan of action and began to find a suitable mate in early February.

After their first introduction we knew this was the right decision, because the two immediately started to breed. Just like humans this does not always guarantee offspring, but appropriately on Valentines Day our experts where able to determine that she is in fact GRAVID! Which means in about 3 months TWINKIE will be the proud mother of 40-70 baby Reticulated Pythons.

Want to meet dad, learn about his family, or even find out what special characteristics the new babies could have? I'm sure you have these questions and more, but we will have to wait to answer these in another blog. We'll be keeping you up to date on how TWINKIE is doing, what comes next, and any other questions you send us both here on The Reptile Zoo Blog and on TWINKIE's official fan page www.Facebook.com/WorldsLargestSnake

Until next time. Love is in the Air!

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Hidden Treasures

Today, here at The Reptile Zoo, we found a precious treasure. Hidden and protected beneath a water bowl, we found a Caledonian Giant Gecko egg. These fun creatures are known as Giant Geckos because of their size. They’re the largest species of gecko living today, growing to be approximately 17 inches in length.

 However, they’re eggs are not as such. Caledonian eggs are about the size of a small peanut; they’re white and look a bit wrinkled because of the warm and humid environment. We’re so excited to meet our new friend in approximately 3-5 months.

He or she will crawl and strength out of their shell and enter into their home – The Reptile Zoo. Come check out all of our fun friends! You might get lucky and find a hidden treasure, too!

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Little Friends of Jack

This past weekend we have been super busy with new and potential new arrivals, from hatching eggs to discovering freshly laid ones.

We were all very excited about the arrival of 9 Arizona Mountain King Snakes early on Saturday morning, and nobody was more excited than long time staffer Craig Tauchman who cares for the native species here in The Reptile Zoo. You can see in the picture below just how much he loves these snakes as he even has a custom made bracelet with the same pattern!

 

The arrival of these snakes gives me the perfect opportunity to talk to you a little bit about Coral Snake patterns vs King Snake patterns. Several non-venomous colubrids have similar red/black/yellow banded patterns to the venomous Coral Snakes. They mimic the Coral Snake’s pattern in an attempt to warn off predators, mimicking other more dangerous species is a common defense mechanism within the reptile world.

A good rhyme to remember to help you to distinguish if it is a venomous Coral snake or a non-venomous Colubrid is;

If red touches black, he’s a friend of Jack, BUT if red touches yellow you’re a dead fellow!

 

Even though this simple rhyme is a great way to help you remember, we recommend that you don’t attempt to pick up any of these snakes in the wild, just in case.

 

 

 

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Lets See How They Grow! Gator Edition

Since the opening of The Reptile Zoo we have been lucky enough to add 4 American Alligators of various sizes to our collection. The first gators to become part of The Reptile Zoo family were Gomer and Pyle who were each two years old and about 2 feet long. 

Next we welcomed Darthgator a five year old 4 foot male gator. Since coming to The Reptile Zoo Gomer and Pyle have grown to almost the same size as Darthgator when he first arrived. Growth in American Alligators is an indicator that the animals are in the correct habitat and maintaining a healthy diet. Here at The Reptile Zoo our gator friends like to each chicken and lots of it. 

Gomer and Pyle prefer chicken legs while Darthgator has moved on to full chicken breasts. Which is represented in Darthgator's growth to reach at least 6 feet in length with an impressive girth.

A couple months ago our final gator addition came in the smallest package, Davey a petit yearling American Alligator. Davey is still eating goldfish, but is just about large enough to move up to a larger prey soon!

Now that you have seen the before and after photos you'll have to come to The Reptile Zoo and visit these growing giants!

 

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Baby Fever!

“D’AAWWE! Look at the ity bity baby waby lizards!!”  Yes, this is a VERY common response to the new For Sale stock of BABY Argentine Black and White Tegus and Savannah Monitors we now have in stock.  Here at Prehistoric Pets, we consistently get request for Savannahs and Tegus of all sorts.  Luckily for us, we managed to get in quite the impressive stock.  Which is best for you?  BOTH! Dur.  All joking aside, here are some simple and general facts about these friendly creatures and your possible future pet!

 

Starting on the smaller side of things (only by a bit) we have in stock baby Savannah Monitors.

These adorable lizards maximum size is rarely more than 3 feet in length, with the females being considerably smaller.  Although the Savannah is native to Africa, they make fairly easy reptiles to own here in the States despite the ever-changing weather and environmental issues.  When threatened, the Savannah protects itself through camouflage; they also prefer to flee or play dead when in danger, but if cornered, defends itself with tail lashes and if need be, a powerful, vise-like bite.  OUCH!  Think that’s the end of it? Far from! When threatened by a predator, the monitor occasionally rolls onto its back and clutches a hind leg in its mouth, creating a ring with its body and making itself harder for the animal to swallow whole while playing dead.  The Oscar for “Best at Playing Dead” goes tooo…..the SAVANNAH MONITOR!! YAY! 

To top it all off, the Savannah’s have pretty simple diets which include gut loaded insects like crickets, roaches, and earthworms along with appropriately sized rodents; Pinky mice, fuzzies, adult mice, and various sized rats. Consistent handling will make Savannah’s tamer but like all monitors, if they are not handled often savannah monitors can become aggressive.  As always, these and many other reptiles will make a great addition to any family!

 

Jumping up in size by a fraction is the ever so adored Argentine Black and White Tegu!  FINALLY in by popular demand, we’ve got a fresh batch of crazy cool Tegu babies for you to bring home. 

Maybe you’ve seen our infamous Tegu’s Little Red, Big Red and Rambo here at The Reptile Zoo?  Similar to the Savannah, Tegu adult males are much larger than the females and can reach 3 feet in length at maturity and continue to grow to lengths of 4-4.5 feet. The females are much smaller reaching up to 3 feet in total length, from nose to tail.  Now what makes the Tegu such an appealing lizard to consider owning?  Well, most novice and even professional reptile owners appreciate docile or at least somewhat obedient temperaments in their pets.  Luckily, the Argentine Tegus make good pets as they have a tendency to become attached to their owners and are generally docile as adults.  Tegus have even been said to actively seek human attention the way a cat or dog would.

PEEK A BOO TEGU!

 A well cared for animal will live for about 20 years in the wild, and possibly LONGER in captivity! *However, as with most reptiles, if not handled regularly they will show more aggressive signs since they are less comfortable with the handler.* 

Heard enough to know you’re ready to make the leap into your first totally cool, totally awesome, totally REPTILIOUS purchase adventure?!  Then you know where to go; right here at Prehistoric Pets!  Alongside our new baby Savannah Monitors and Black and White Tegus, we have a huge selection of snakes, lizards, amphibians and MORE so don’t forget to stop on by or visit our website at PrehistoricPets.com!

Ciao!

^O^..........Priscilla

 

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Trading Up at Gecko Lofts

 

Here at The Reptile Zoo it's all about upgrade, upgrade, upgrade and the same is true for our animals! After spending 6 months at the "Crestie Condos" in Prehistoric Pets as young couples the crested geckos finally decided they wanted to start a family and really settle down. Luckily their friends the Leachies knew just the spot, "Gecko Lofts" at The Reptile Zoo.

 

 

The crested gecko families knew they couldn't go wrong with the suggestion from the Leachies. Bubbles and Squishy have been at the Gecko Lofts for over year now and enjoying the extra space along with their two cute new additions to the family. So with little hesitation they packed up their bags, gathered their furniture and moved from the Crestie Condos at Prehistoric Pets to the Gecko Lofts at The Reptile Zoo. It didn't take long for everyone to get comfortable and enjoy the sights and sounds of their new digs.

 

 

 

They've even started to blend in to their new environment. Can you count how many crested geckos are enjoying their new cage in the picture below?

 

 

Here's a close up shot of one of the crestie bellies. Check out their specially designed fingers for sticking on just about anything, including glass!

 

 

Next time you're at The Reptile Zoo be sure to check out Gecko Lofts and it's oh so cool residents!

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April Fools Baby! ....Not?

With all the buzz floating around about possible pranks on April Fool’s day, many of us were hesitant to take anything too seriously for fear of being made a joke.  However, not everything was just fun and games; we had quite the surprise awaiting us.  For those of you who weren’t aware, reptiles like Blue Tongue Skinks and Boas give LIVE birth rather than laying eggs.  To make things even more bizarre, you can’t really tell when Skinks and Boas are pregnant, so the babies are always a big surprise.  Talk about an April Fool’s not-so Prank ;P.

 

Why am I telling you all this?  Well, that’s exactly what happened this week!  Staffer Rosa A. was doing her routine cage cleaning when she was greeted by a baby surprise.  Elbow deep in the Blue Tongue Skink cage, Rosa was scrubbing away when a brand new baby Skink popped out of the woodwork (Literally) to say Hello!  Shocked at this neat additions presence, Rosa informed management of our little buddy’s arrival.  Although the babies look grown, this is how they are originally born.  They are birthed at this size and their physical traits and characteristics will stay the same from birth.  Kinda cool huh?!

Think this baby is cute as a reptile button?  Why not own one of your own?!  Skinks are easy to care for, good for amateur herpers and have a simple diet consisting of insects, some fruits, flowers and berries.  No, in case you were wondering, they don’t get their name from Blueberry stained mouths after a tasty Skink meal.  In fact, they are named Blue Tongues because of their bright blue tongues that are used as DEFENSE.  Skinks use their bright tongues in a dramatic fashion to startle, distract, and ward off predators.  This works mainly because in the wild, anything colored bright blue, yellow etc. means POISON, so any approaching predator who sees the Skinks tongue think, “He’s Poisonous, I’m not going to eat that guy!” and hence the Skink lives to see another day.  So no need to fret or fear, they are tricksters but very sweet and harmless.  In fact, Skinks are shy and secretive and seldom stray far from their shelter (Homebody Lizards). 

So whether you want to take one home and make it your new beloved pet or you want to stop by The Reptile Zoo and check out all of our Skink families, we offer and encourage BOTH options!  Check out Prehistoric Pets for any available Skinks for sale or stop by The Reptile Zoo and say Hello to the variety of Skinks we house. =)  Either way, don’t forget to come by the Zoo and show a little love to our new Blue Tongue Skink baby!

Ciao!

^O^…………..Priscilla

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The Leachie Family!

 

Here's the story of how Little Timmy and his little brother (or sister) became to be.

First comes love...

Then comes marriage...

Then comes a baby...

in a baby carriage.

See reptiles are just like humans! Come visit the whole Leachie Family at The Reptile Zoo this weekend! www.TheReptileZoo.com

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A Tidalwave of Tortoises


If you are looking for a cool pet...outside the norm of cats and dogs...quieter than birds...slower than rabbits and hamsters...and not quiet as intimidating as a lizard or snake...

Look no further than a TORTOISE! These awesome reptiles make for an exotic, but quite easy, new pet. Great with kids, pretty low-maintenance (for a reptile), and totally vegetarian! You can't miss!



Here at Prehistoric Pets, we just received a couple new groups of Sulcatta hatchlings! They are the cutest little guys...barely bigger than a golfball when they first hatch. One group is still a bit too small to sell...but the other is ready to go, at $149.99 each. Sulcatta Tortoises (AKA African Spur-thigh) can grow to be 150 years old, and 200 pounds! They love leafy greens, carrots, squash, and WATERMELON (among other fruits and veggies....but NO citrus). As long as they get some calcium powder on their food, and daytime in the sun (or UVB) with plenty of heat, they are very happy pets.

Where's Waldo??


At about 10 years old, they are usually big enough to be outside...as long as they have a pen, and animals can't get to them (coyotes). But remember, they like to dig! Some folks even have little doghouse-type enclosures for the tortoises to crawl into (with heat) when they are cold or stressed...good idea. Kids love them, because they are different, but not scary. We have larger tortoises as well, ranging from the grapefruit-size juvenile ($249.99), all the way up to the 100-pounders (females $999.99). Prices vary.




However, since these guys DO grow to be pretty huge, you may want to try something that stays pretty small. We have two Russian Tortoises left...they are pretty popular as well because they usually grow no larger than a head of lettuce. So, if you are looking for something a bit smaller, come in for one (at $159.99) before they are gone!




Remember, you can always call or email us with your questions!

info@jurassicparties.com
714-964-3525


<3.............Thalia
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