Open Day at The Reptile Room 2012

What a weekend! We had so much fun meeting everyone at The Reptile Room for their open house. We'll write more about it later but we wanted to share some of the great photos taken by visitors to the event!

If you're in Europe and you missed your chance to meet Jay of check out the Prehistoric Pets stock available through The Reptile Room you still have a chance. This weekend the team will be at Terraristika in Hamm, Germany and next weekend you can find them at Exotic Forum just outside Madrid, Spain where Jay will be a featured speaker with Mark O'Shea!

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Egg Day at The Reptile Zoo

It's not everyday you get to see a huge clutch of pythons hatch in front of your very eyes... well that may not be the case at The Reptile Zoo. We are lucky enough to partner with Prehistoric Pets which means guests at The Reptile Zoo can have this once in lifetime opportunity... more than once in a lifetime!

 

As part of our coming expansion of The Reptile Zoo we are beginning some new and exciting demonstration programs. One of our most popular demonstrations is the live hatching snakes. For now this program has limited availability, but once our expansion is complete guests to The Reptile Zoo will be able to enjoy this experience daily with a birds eye view into our state of the art incubator and hatch room!

 

Just yesterday guests of The Reptile Zoo got the chance to have the first peek at a brand new clutch of Reticulated Python eggs. It is amazing to think each of these little snakes has the potential to grow as large as TWINKIE the 350lb world's largest snake who anxiously looked on from her custom enclosure at The Reptile Zoo.

 

We announced this special opportunity across our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages and just like magic The Reptile Zoo was full of excited guests just waiting to see these little babies hatch! Visitors even got the chance to be part of filming for our YouTube channel! 

After all of the eggs had been open, to provide the best hatch opportunity for the snakes, guests got the extra special chance to actually touch these eggs.

To be sure this was an educational opportunity in every sense of the word. Staff from Prehistoric Pets and The Reptile Zoo answered many questions from the crowd about the potential size of these animals, the specific colorations, hatch proceedure and many more. 

To see the answers to all of their questions and learn exactly what snakes were in each egg be sure to check back on our Facebook and YouTube channels!

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Expanding Behind the Scenes


Remember when we said we were finally demolishing the “Gauntlet” to make room for a brand new breeding room… that day might not be here quite yet, but we are getting closer. Just look at the expansion we have planned!

 


If you think that’s beginning to look impressive just check out the numbers. In the new breeding wing will be a 1000 sq ft facility housing 147 full size breeding cages plus 3 huge new incubators!


Not only will these new enclosures be the best of the best for our animals, custom designed by Jay Brewer from his over 30 years’ experience in breeding and keeping large pythons. They are also going to be a very exciting one-of-a-kind view experience for all guests to The Reptile Zoo. As they have designed it guests will be able to look into the behind the scenes action and even be a part of the egg hatching experience.

It may look like we are already done, but we have plenty left to do! Just check out all the work it took to get this far!





It takes a dedicated and passionate team and to make these dreams come true, but luckily we have that team! Everyone has been pitching in to help wherever needed, even late into the night.

As you can tell founder Jay Brewer and breeding manager Tim O’Reilly are more than a little excited about the big plans they have in-store for you.

Check back in the next couple months to see our progress and hopefully we will have the breeding room of our dreams completed and on display by the next time you visit The Reptile Zoo!

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Early arrival as Ball Python eggs begin to hatch!!

This morning we were happily surprised to find that 3 of our Ball Python eggs began to hatch 5 days earlier than expected!

 

The six eggs were laid way back on May 8th and weren't due to hatch for another 5 days! Three of these eggs "pipped" (the baby snakes poked their heads out) on their own while the other 3 had to be cut open to make sure they all survived.

 

These snakes could take anything from one to three days to hatch out completely so we will be watching them very carefully throughout this week.

These eggs contain 5 "lessers" and 1 "normal" snake. "Lesser" is what we call a co-dominant  genetic mutation, and usually half of the snakes in a batch of eggs will have this gene and half won't. That makes these snakes a double surprise as they are not only 5 days early, but we got 5 "lessers" too!!

Above, on the left is an adult "lesser" and on the right is an adult "normal".

These babies will be for sale in Prehistoric pets in the coming months. Ball Pyhtons make great starter pets and these two morphs are an easy introduction to the wide variety of Ball Pyhton Morphs available.

 

 

 

 

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Destory the Gauntlet!

After many long years of precariously working in the famed Prehistoric Pets gauntlet it's time for destruction has come! 

 

 

By removing the gauntlet not only are we making more room for expansions to The Reptile Zoo, but also expansions for Prehistoric Pets breeding and caretaking faciliites! 

 

 

The large reticulated pythons who were previously housed in the gauntlet are already enjoying their new digs inside the top secret addition! Breeder and all around Go-To Man Tim O'Reilly has been in charge of the renovation while founder Jay Brewer is visiting Prehistoric's African fans at the SOS Reptile Expo.

 

 

As always Tim did not let Jay down! This part of the renovation and relocation was finished ahead of schedule with only the best precision!

 

 

 

Tim and Jay have taken this rennovation opportunity to re-think and re-design these new enclosures from top to bottom. This is just part of the Prehistoric way! We are always re-imagining re-building and planning for our next big move!

 

 

 

Check back in the next couple months to see what progress we've made and maybe what babies will be the first to be produced in the newest top-secret addition to Prehistoric Pets!

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Cinco de Mayo Everyday at The Reptile Zoo!

 

 

¡Gracias a nuestros muchos seguidores en todo México! Ciudad de México y Guadalajara están en las 10 ciudades para los amantes de Prehistoric Pets! Estamos dedicando este blog para ti! Feliz Cinco de Mayo!

 

 

Here at The Reptile Zoo we love our reptilian friends from Mexico and South America. Many parts of Mexico have a great climate for reptiles with almost 200 native varieties within the country including the common Iguana and Boa.

 

 

We are excited about the timely arrival of our newest addition to The Reptile Zoo a beautiful Gila Monster. We have been keeping a colony of Beaded Lizards at The Reptile Zoo for a little over a year now and we are excited to add their close relative and only other recognized venomous lizard to the ever updating exhibits.

 

 

Both the Gila Monster and Beaded lizard are part of the genus Heloderma which translates to studded skin from the Acient Greek. The unique skin, a key characterstic of these animals, is underlaid with beady scales made from  bony osteoderms. 

 

 

The Heloderma genus includes only these two species with six sub-species all carrying the venemous charactersitics. Unlike snakes their venom glands are located in the lower jaw and can only render the venom by chewing on the predator. Studies conducted using this venom have been found to treat affects of diabetes, Alzheimers, HIV and possibly breast and lung cancer. 

 

 

At The Reptile Zoo we are lucky enough to keep a colony of Beaded Lizards, which means when the breeding season comes we may have BABY Beaded Lizards! Beaded Lizards become mature around 7 years old and females normally lay their eggs between October and December. The size of these clutches can vary  from 2-8 eggs with the babies hatching in the summer of the following year. 

 

 

Thanks for celebrating Cinco de Mayo with us! Hopefully you learned something while still enjoying yourself. If you're ever in the area be sure to stop by The Reptile Zoo to check out our collection of Mexico native reptiles and of course our Beaded Lizards and Gila Monsters!

 

 

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Guest Blogging from Across the Pond

 



Hey Everyone,

I just wanted to give you all a heads up that I will be staying out at The Reptile Room for a week (be available there the 3rd-7th). For those who don't know, I am the sales manager from Prehistoric Pets in California- and we have loads of super high end animals in stock over there right now- some of which can ONLY be seen in person there, or at our shop in Cali.

I am really hoping that many of you will stop by- The Reptile Room has constructed a new VIP room for the high end animals, and it will be open to the public for the whole time I am there. I'm really hoping to have some great discussions regarding the most cutting edge genetics, ideas for new breeding projects, and whatever else you would like to pick my brain about.


It should be a great environment, a lot closer to many of you than any European shows, and I will be willing to sell anything you are interested in at show pricing. The most important thing to me is really just to make some good conversation with great people, and give you a more personal idea of who you would be dealing with if you ever were to get anything sent out there from us.


Many key breeders in the UK are working with genetics they have gotten from us on direct imports over the years, but never before has the opportunity been given for anyone at any level of the game to get directly involved with some of the front runners of the Retic game, as they now are able to through our partnership with The Reptile Room (I hope that doesn't sound too prideful- but I guess being an American I can't always help it, and you certainly expect it anyhow- haha).

I really hope to see you all there! -Garrett Hartle, Prehistoric Pets

 

 

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Breed my pretties, BREED!

So I posed a question to all of you Herpers this morning, asking what kinds of questions YOU had about reptiles and such.  After scanning thru the many responses I noticed a lot of you asked several questions in regards to breeding.  So I decided to base today’s blog around lizard breeding since snake breeding has SO many points and aspects to cover, it’s much easier to leave that to individual training.  Luckily, lizards are in such popular demand that this blog entry should help lots of you guys learn to breed and start your own lizard community at home. =)

 

First of all, you should know that if the lizards are comfortable enough in their surroundings to breed, it shows that the artificial environment provided is adequate. But in order for this to happen, you have to take care of as many variables as possible.  So step one, the artificial environment needs to be large enough, have separate hides for each lizard and offer the same humidity as the natural habitat of your lizard, so make sure you study up on the natural environment of your pet and simplify the caging to  something they are accustomed to.  Secondly, in the wild, male lizards naturally stake out their home territory and defend it from other males. When the home territory is as small as a 30-gallon terrarium, having just one male per cage becomes even more vital.  However, most lizards do well when kept in trios of one male and two females.  Pssh, of course it works smoothly with multiple females than males! =P 

Day and Night cycles should equate with the breeding cycle in the lizard's area of origin.  If your pet is wild, they require at least one year of adjustment to a change in light cycles and the confines of captivity.  So what happens if you have a pair of lizards, you've done everything right – but so far there's STILL no breeding?  There are a few things you can do, first try separating the lizards. Many breeders prefer to keep the sexes separate until breeding is desired. Then the lizards are placed together for a week or so or until breeding takes place then separated again.  This helps keep the stress levels to a minimum and encourage the desire to breed.  Another helpful trick is to add a second male to the cage in hopes the males will create breeding displays between themselves, which tends to arouse breeding interest in the female.  Us gals are always impressed by showy displays of affection and desire =P.  You may need to also provide a period of dormancy/hibernation for lizards that hibernate, if you're unsure of what your lizards require in dormancy length, begin with three weeks to avoid putting too much stress on them.  At the end of the dormancy cycle, restore lighting and temperature levels and offer food and after the lizards have regained their activity levels, put the lizards together. 

Once your lizards have bred, for the egg-laying species, provide an egg deposition site.  For live-bearing lizard, provide a secluded area where the female can give birth to her young without fear of attack by another lizard.  Females may become very aggressive toward other lizards in the cage during and after child birth. Make sure you have a suitable supply of tiny insects (i.e. flightless fruit flies, cricket hatchlings) accessible when the young are born or surface from their eggs.

Now you all should be expert lizard breeders =P!  When you adapt all these requirements in your pet’s enclosure, you should have great luck and success with the finalized breeding.  For any more questions, feel free to call us here at the shop, we will be happy to help you!

Ciao

^O^……………Priscilla

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Forget Jurassic Park... WE have the Real Deal!

Familiar with Steven Spielberg’s major hit movie “Jurassic Park”?  Well if you’re a fan of ours, I’m SURE you’ve seen the film that sparked the interest in Prehistoric creatures worldwide.  In the iconic film, many dinosaurs and scientific theories were shown and explained but many people were left curious about our ancient ancestors.  Fortunatley, we have a chunk of that history RIGHT HERE in Fountain Valley, CA at Prehistoric Pets/ The Reptile Zoo!  We house several types of unique fossils from all kinds of prehistoric beings and plants.  Today’s blog is focusing on the ever so favored, Velociraptor! 

Measuring at a whopping almost 7 feet in length, this mid sized hunter sported jaws lined with 26–28 widely spaced teeth on each side, each more strongly serrated on the back edge than the front.  Too add to their ferocious build, they also had a large “hands” with three strongly curved claws.  The second claw, for which Velociraptors are most famous, was highly modified and held off of the ground. The relatively large, sickle-shaped enlarged claw, which could be over 2.6 in long around its outer edge, was most likely a predatory device used to tear into prey and possibly deliver a fatal blow!  HOWEVER, the "raptors" portrayed in Jurassic Park were modeled after a larger relative, Deinonychus, so Velociraptors are actually quite smaller in size than depicted! 

This astounding creature dates back to be about 80-85 million years old and have been predominately found in the areas of Mongolia.  Velociraptors are believed to may have been able to run up to roughly 40 mph for short bursts and may have even hunted in packs!  Unlike other well-known fossils that have been discovered, about a dozen Velociraptor fossils have been found, including one ever so famous example that died in a battle to the death with Protoceratops!  Check it out!! >>>

“Grrrrraaaawwwwwrrrr!!!”

Velociraptors had fairly large brains compared to other dinosaur species, which made them one of the most intelligent of the dinosaurs.  The study of dinosaur skulls reveals that the Velociraptor had excellent hearing, a powerful sense of smell, and binocular vision. That sounds like a pretty awesome dinosaur!   Most fossils and skeletons are held in world famous museums and sites BUT you can come to Prehistoric Pets/ The Reptile Zoo and check out Velociraptor EGGS we have on display!!  That’s right, Fossil EGGS that at one period in time, could have housed baby raptor hatchlings!  D’Awwweee!

Velociraptor Eggs

Don’t forget, we have MANY more fossils in stock for display and for sale.  Make sure to pick one up for someone special and give the unique gift of Prehistoric presents!

^O^………….Priscilla

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REPTILES Magazine at The Reptile Zoo

 

A couple months ago we got the call from REPTILES magazine offering us the opportunity to partner on a upcoming project, of course we responded with YES! REPTILES magazine and ReptileChannel.com are industry leaders as a high quality resource for all info reptile related. We were excited to learn Reptiles was looking to launch a video care series for first time reptile owners and wanted Jay, founder of Prehistoric Inc. to share his knowledge on the some of the most common starter pets. This seemed like the perfect fit; here at Prehistoric one of our main goals of our organization is to improve reptile awareness and proper care through responsible reptile ownership.

 

 

With some discussion on what animals to start the series Jay and REPTILES/ReptilesChannel.com editor Russ Case decided on the Bearded Dragon, Sulcatta Tortoise, Blue Tongue Skink, Frilled Dragon, as well as Jay’s specialties the Reticulated Python and Asian Water Monitor. The plan was to provide the basic details for each of these animals covering questions like: Where in the wild does the species originally come from? How big does it get? How long does it typically live in captivity? What kind of substrate is good to use? and What does it eat? Along with these facts we also used the opportunity of film to show samples of the animals in a yearling and adult size, as well as suggested products.

 

 

After all the planning we were finally ready to film. Last Monday editor Russ Case, web editor John Virata and the filming crew Shawn and Paul arrived at The Reptile Zoo ready to for a day filled with reptiles, cameras, and loads of great information on reptile care. Guests to The Reptile Zoo had the opportunity to act as the live audience watching the interaction and personalities of Jay and Russ develop through the informal interview format of the videos. Set behind Gator Island, the newest addition to The Reptile Zoo, the surroundings proved an easy distraction during filming with Prehistoric’s signature Sulfur Water Monitor breeding project in action and Frank the Asian Water Monitor currently featured on Disney Channel’s JESSIE walking in and out of the shots.

 

 

Just when the crew thought filming was done for the day, Reticulated Python breeding specialist, Tim O’Reilly invited the REPTILES team to watch the unveiling of the newest clutch of eggs. The offer was too good to refuse so the team moved the set into the incubator room where every snake produced by Prehistoric Pets is incubated and assisted in hatching and almost every one of these hatchings is filmed for viewers around the world to enjoy on our popular YouTube channel, PrehistoricPetsTV.

 


Video Link

 

 

At the end of the day Jay had to head out to start on his next project, but the REPTILES crew stuck around just a bit longer to capture some b-roll footage of the animals on a white backdrop to insert into the completed videos.

 

 

It was a great day at The Reptile Zoo with the REPTILES crew and we are anxious to see the final product which is set to launch on ReptileChannel.com and our YouTube channel in the coming months.

 

 

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