Little Friends of Jack

This past weekend we have been super busy with new and potential new arrivals, from hatching eggs to discovering freshly laid ones.

We were all very excited about the arrival of 9 Arizona Mountain King Snakes early on Saturday morning, and nobody was more excited than long time staffer Craig Tauchman who cares for the native species here in The Reptile Zoo. You can see in the picture below just how much he loves these snakes as he even has a custom made bracelet with the same pattern!

 

The arrival of these snakes gives me the perfect opportunity to talk to you a little bit about Coral Snake patterns vs King Snake patterns. Several non-venomous colubrids have similar red/black/yellow banded patterns to the venomous Coral Snakes. They mimic the Coral Snake’s pattern in an attempt to warn off predators, mimicking other more dangerous species is a common defense mechanism within the reptile world.

A good rhyme to remember to help you to distinguish if it is a venomous Coral snake or a non-venomous Colubrid is;

If red touches black, he’s a friend of Jack, BUT if red touches yellow you’re a dead fellow!

 

Even though this simple rhyme is a great way to help you remember, we recommend that you don’t attempt to pick up any of these snakes in the wild, just in case.

 

 

 

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Color Me Rad at The Reptile Zoo

We knew our visitors to The Reptile Zoo were smart, but how could we have guessed they were soo creative too! A couple months ago we added a coloring station to the hands-on fun at The Reptile Zoo and since then we have been amazed by the rad art our guests have made. We provide the template, a playful cartoon illustration of Thelma & Louise one of the two-headed snake, but they provide the style! Some take the approach of Picasso, some Warhol, some Pollock, and some have a style all their own. These pieces of art are so unique we decided to make our own virtual museum to showcase their talents. Visit www. Facebook.com/TheReptileZoo to check out our fan art or better yet stop by The Reptile Zoo in person and make your own art to add to the collection!

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Photos for a Cause

Does your reptile love the camera? Do you love the camera?

Jurassic Parties, The Reptile Zoo and Prehistoric Pets would like to invite you to use your photography skills to support the United States Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK) A conservation, education and advocacy organization dedicated to protecting reptiles & amphibians for our future.

 

USARK represents and aims to protect the rights of the reptile community in legal hearings from Washington D.C. across the United States.For those not familiar with reptiles photos sometimes speak louder than words creating an instant connection with the viewer. USARK is seeking photos for various materials and presentations to continue accurately representation of their temperament and the thousands who love and care for them

 

 

The three categories of pictures requested are:

1) Positive, safe interactions between humans and reptiles;

 

2) Show us your set ups! Reptiles in great, well designed, SAFE, clean, and appropriate enclosures;

 

 

 

3) Reptiles in their natural environments.

Please send your photos to erika@silverdogs.com with a permission letter. (We have included a basic sample letter below) If you have any specific restrictions on your permission please include them in this letter and they will be honored by USARK. No photos provided by members will be used in any merchandise or offered for sale.

Copyright Holder

Name:

Address:

Phone:

Email:

 

I, _____________________________ give the United States Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK)

permission for the unlimited use of the attached photograph(s) on its website, brochures, pamphlets and educational materials.

 

 

For more information visit www.USARK.org

The US Association of Reptile Keepers (USARK) is a science and education based advocacy for the responsible private ownership of, and trade in reptiles. We endorse caging standards, sound husbandry, escape prevention protocols, and an integrated approach to vital conservation issues. Our goal is to facilitate cooperation between government agencies, the scientific community, and the private sector in order to produce policy proposals that will effectively address important husbandry and conservation issues. The health of these animals, public safety, and maintaining ecological integrity are our primary concerns.

This post has been shared from the Official USARK Facebook page. (https://www.facebook.com/pages/USARK-United-States-Association-of-Reptile-Keepers/93475517723)

 

 

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Destory the Gauntlet!

After many long years of precariously working in the famed Prehistoric Pets gauntlet it's time for destruction has come! 

 

 

By removing the gauntlet not only are we making more room for expansions to The Reptile Zoo, but also expansions for Prehistoric Pets breeding and caretaking faciliites! 

 

 

The large reticulated pythons who were previously housed in the gauntlet are already enjoying their new digs inside the top secret addition! Breeder and all around Go-To Man Tim O'Reilly has been in charge of the renovation while founder Jay Brewer is visiting Prehistoric's African fans at the SOS Reptile Expo.

 

 

As always Tim did not let Jay down! This part of the renovation and relocation was finished ahead of schedule with only the best precision!

 

 

 

Tim and Jay have taken this rennovation opportunity to re-think and re-design these new enclosures from top to bottom. This is just part of the Prehistoric way! We are always re-imagining re-building and planning for our next big move!

 

 

 

Check back in the next couple months to see what progress we've made and maybe what babies will be the first to be produced in the newest top-secret addition to Prehistoric Pets!

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THIS WEEKEND: Jay Brewer at SOS² Reptile Expo

Last week we let you know founder Jay Brewer was travelling with some of his team to South Africa where he would be enjoying the sites and native wildlife, but for those in South Africa we left the best part out. This weekend you can come meet him and check out some of our unique pythons at the 2012 SOS² Reptile Expo!  

 

 

This is Jay's first time visiting the expo, which is in it's 10th year as the leading South African Reptile Expo. This year it will be held at the Emperor's Palace in Kempton Park centrally located near Johannesburg International airport. Visit SOS² this Saturday and Sunday, the 5th and 6th of May between 9 AM - 4 PM for your chance to view and even take home some of the best reptiles the South African reptile community has to offer!

 

 

Jay has been excited for this trip, and especially this expo for months! South Africa is one of his favorite places to visit and he is looking forward to finally meeting the whole reptile community and sharing Prehistoric Pets one of a kind boas, burmese and reticulated pythons that have been previously unavailable in South Africa!

 

 

We have been luck enough to partner with organizer Arno Naude to set-up a permanent distributor relationship within the country, just like our friends The Reptile Room in Europe. We have sent Arno a great selection of animals, which if not all snatched up at this weekend's expo, will continue to be available within the country. 

 

 

If you live in the area make sure to stop by this weekend's event it is sure to be filled with the best animals South Africa has to offer and plenty of great people to meet. If you happen to see Jay while you're there be sure to stop him and say hello he always loves a good chat about animals, especially the new reticulated python projects we are working on right now!

Don't forget that's Saturday and Sunday 9AM-4PM SOS² Reptile Expo at Emperor's Palace in Kempton Park! See you there!

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Jet Lag Recovery at Prehistoric Pets

Well, everybody, I’m back at Prehistoric Pets and all settled in, so I figured it was high time to write up a little blog about my trip to Holland for the exotic animal show, and stay over in Cleveleys, England for a while afterwards.  I had a great time, and met a lot of really great people (and a few… interesting ones as well)! 

I flew in to Amsterdam, where I was met by Dean Turner from The Reptile Room- a great exotic animal shop with high quality stock that acts as our official UK and European brokers. These guys are pros, and make it easy for me- they picked me up at the airport with all of our display materials and animals (in custom made climate controlled traveling cages) and took us out to the hotel we stayed at outside of the Houten convention center.

 

 

  We got the animals settled into the room, and headed out for a night on the town in Amsterdam.  Being careful not to turn the wrong corner (haha), we had pizza and watched the Blackpool football (soccer to us Yanks) game at an Irish pub, of all places.  One of the guys from the Reptile Room, Louis Charlesworth, got pretty rowdy with his team winning the match- so we had to watch his back a little, but all had a good time. 

 

 

The next day- we got the traveling displays all set up, and spent the day either delivering preordered animals, or helping people select exactly the right snake for their  situation- no matter what the budget, breeding plans, or personal preferences are, we had the snakes on hand with a great selection.  We go to many of the shows in Houten, and also in Hamm Germany- and this is a great way for overseas customers to meet up with the breeder directly, ask their questions, and make sure to get the right snake- often at great deals too!

 

The day was long, and by the end of it, my voice was gone (I have been known to talk!).  It was time to head back to England for the boys, and normally, this would be the point where they drop me back off at the airport in Amsterdam and I fly home as well, but not this time! I rode the ferry with them back to England, where I spent the week working with our animals over there (and helping them out with a few of theirs as well).

 

 

 

They put me to work during the slow times, but thanks to a great job of advertising my presence there, there wasn’t much down time anyway- we had people traveling across the country, and even visiting from Ireland and Scotland- to come see the awesome display snakes we had brought and finally talk face to face about some of the exciting things going on in the blossoming  UK Reticulated Python market. 

 

Lots of longtime customers stopped by, and even more new customers who had been thinking about their first retic came down and finally made the plunge!  I met a lot of leaders in the reptile industry while I was there as well, from a variety of different fields, and met my first European Adder too!

 

 

I want to say thank you to everyone who traveled so far to come out and say hi to me while I was there, and of course, a big thanks to all of our customers- past and present!  I hope it’s not too long before I get to visit again- the taste of the Blood Pudding and Haggis (not as bad as it sounds, by the way- I quite enjoyed it) is calling me!

 

 

-Garrett

Sales Manager, Prehistoric Inc.

sales@prehistoricinc.com

 

 

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Snake Walking with TWINKIE at The Reptile Zoo

Most people would never consider "walking" a snake, especially one of TWINKIE's size, but here at The Reptile Zoo we like to be a little different.

 

 

 

This weekend we had an impromptu retic party with some local enthusiasts as well as some from the East Coast. It was a great time to visit with friends who appreciate the variety of reticulated python morphs produced by Prehistoric Pets.

 

 

When you're talking retics with Prehistoric Pets, its pretty hard to overlook the "elephant" or at least elephant size retic in the room. That's right we're talking about TWINKIE our 350lb+ Amel Reticulated Python, who we believe to be the largest in captivity. To defy all stereotypes she is an absolute sweetheart who with the right team can be easily handled. Luckily with all of these experienced retic breeders on-site this weekend was the perfect time to take her out on a walk.

 

 

 Once out of the cage we weren't really sure who was walking who, but it sure made for a Kodak moment for the many Reptile Zoo visitors. While she was out we were able to capture some quick shots of her in all her beauty. You might notice it took THIRTEEN guys just to support her body! 

 

 

Be on the look-out for the full video on The Reptile Zoo and Prehistoric Pets official YouTube pages, but until then become a fan to check out all of the most recent TWINKIE happenings at www.Facebook.com/WorldsLargestTwinkie 

 

 

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Ewe Rock! at the Youth Expo 2012

 

This weekend thousands of families braved the storm and enjoyed the annual Youth Expo at the Orange County Fairgrounds. We love this event because first of all its FREE fun for the whole family... how many places can you still find that? We also love it's focus on education this year adding a college fair for hundreds of anxious highschoolers planning their next steps.

 

 

Of course guests went crazy for our interactive reptile booth where we displayed just a glimpes into all of the exotic animals on display at The Reptile Zoo. With Ball Pythons, Ratsnakes, and Bearded Dragons there were plenty of reasons why our booth was filled to the brim the whole weekend, but the crowd favorite had to be the huge African Spur Thigh Tortoises.

 

 

 

If the live animals weren't enough guests got a kick out of our big Dino friend. Taking a second to pose for photos while he showed his toothy grin.

 

 

 

Some of our visitors were so enchanted by the reptiles they could barely stand to leave, but we let them know that not only are they cool to look at reptiles actually make great low maintenance pets, which definitely perked them up.

 

 

Visitors even recieved a special offer for admission to the continually expanding zoo. They were excited and shocked to learn about our most recent additions like Darthvader the American Alligator, TWINKIE the World's Largest Snake, 5 California Native Rattlesnakes and don't forget Thelma & Louise the Two-Headed Snake.

 

 

Did you miss out? The Prehistoric Adventures team can bring the traveling Reptile Zoo to a town near you creating a one of a kind display for all types of events. These Prehistoric Pets can even come right to your house or school for a Jurassic Party presentation. Check out the details online at www.JurassicParties.com and www.PrehistoricAdventures.com

 

 

 

 

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Reptiles at Church?

 

Do reptiles at a church service seem like an oxymoron? Not at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California reptiles are just one of the many unique features at this community church. Prehistoric Pets and Jurassic Parties started partnering with Saddleback Church a couple years back and we have been priveleged to be included in many of their events since, including annual Blocktober and Vacation Bible School events.

 

 

Every time we are involved with Saddleback there are sure to be plenty of excited kids ready to learn about reptiles. This year's Easter services were no different with over 200 elementary school kids attending just one of the 7 kid-centric services. 

 

 

Even though the groups are large we always get the crowd involved especially with the grand finale, one of our 12 foot Burmese Pythons or a large lizard like Rusty who just happens to be a full-time resident at Saddleback Church. Just when you thought it couldn't get any cooler right!

Rusty is an Asian Water Monitor just like Frank his brother (who plays Mr. Kipling on Disney Channel's JESSIE). Saddleback has built a great enclosure for him to hang out in with his own pool, basking areas, and custom cloud sky ceiling. This huge enclosure is part of "The Extreme" where middle school students come each week to enjoy the reptiles and service.

 

In addition to all of the kiddies who love visiting Rusty, he also gets a lot of attention from the reptile volunteers including founder Jay Brewer who visit each week and provide hands-on interaction with some of the smaller reptiles also housed at Saddleback.

 

 

Here at Prehistoric Pets and Jurassic Parties we love any opportunity to reach such a large and excited group of kids and are always excited when we get the call from Saddleback Church. If you are in the area it's worth a visit to see Rusty and his buddies at Saddleback!

 

 

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LOCOmotion!

“Hurry Priscilla!  Catch the snake, he’s running away!” en route to catch said snake, I started to think to myself, ‘Hmmm I wonder if the kids know HOW snakes actually move around?’  Taking it upon myself to get to the bottom of this mysterious snake movement question, I tossed the question out there.  “Who here knows HOW snakes move around?” shortly after I asked this I was astounded at the many answers our creative little ones had.  “He Runs!” “He Jumps!” “He Flys!” after several minutes of laughing, I chimed back in and told the kids that you learn something new every day, and thanks to their one of a kind Jurassic Party, they were going to learn that and much more!

 

It seems like a simple question to ask but in order to understand the different species; it helps to know even the smallest details (Like movement) that separate them.  Although we may not live in the areas to physically see the different types of movement possible by our Serpent friends, it’s easy to identify the process just by the way the snakes body is formed when he attempts to move.  The most popular and widely known form of movement is called, Serpentine Method.  This S-shape motion is what most people think of when they think of snakes.   Starting at the neck, a snake contracts its muscles, propelling its body from side to side, creating a chain of curves.  They will push off of any bump or other surface to get moving. They move in a wavy motion and wouldn’t be able to move over slick surfaces like glass at all.  Majority of all pet and common snakes will use this method of movement.

Another method used is called Sidewinding.  While side-winding, only a few points of the snakes’ body contact the hot sand at any one time. In environments with few conflict points, snakes may use a variation of serpentine motion to get around. Contracting their muscles and flinging their bodies, sidewinders create an S-shape that only has TWO points of contact with the ground; when they push off, they move sideways. The snake will lift the middle of its body up and then push it down forcing its head to move forward.  Much of a sidewinding snake's body is off the ground while it moves, Cool huh?!  The most infamous example of this type of locomotion can be found in the aptly named, Sidewinder. 

The tracks left behind show at what points the snake's body came into contact with the ground.

The next example of motion is called the Rectilinear Method, this is a slow, creeping, straight movement. The snake uses some of the wide scales on its belly to grip the ground while pushing forward with the others.  These waves are much smaller and curve up and down rather than side to side. When a snake uses caterpillar (Rectilinear) movement, the tops of each curve are lifted above the ground as the ventral scales on the bottoms push against the ground, creating a ripple effect similar to how a caterpillar looks when it walks.  This method of locomotion is extremely slow, but is also almost noiseless and very hard to detect, making it the mode of choice for many species when stalking prey. 

Lastly, there is the Concertina Method.  The previous methods work well for horizontal surfaces, but snakes climb using the Concertina technique. The snake extends its head and the front of its body along the vertical surface and then finds a place to grip with its ventral scales. To get a good hold, it bunches up the middle of its body into tight curves that grip the surface while it pulls its back end up; then it springs forward again to find a new place to grip with its scales!  Like a Spider Monkey Snake!  ^O^ 

Hopefully this information helped shed some light on one of the many reasons why our reptile friends are so unique and special.  Next time you’re watching a snake show, visiting us at the Zoo or playing with your own pet snake; see if you can identify what type of motion the snakes uses to move around!

Ciao!

^O^…….…Priscilla

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