New Indian Ornamental Tarantula..Or is it an illusion?

Here at The Reptile Zoo our beautiful Indian Ornamental Tarantula molted yesterday and left visitors wondering if there were actually 2 tarantulas in the exhibit.

Inidian Ornamental Tarantulas live in monsoon forests, where the climate alternates between very wet and very dry. Poecilotheria species should be regarded with caution, beacuse their bites are considered to be much more significant than those of other tarantulas. Their bites are not lethal, but some poeple may be allergic to their bite which can be a big problem.

 

Tarantulas have an exo-skeletal structure which means unlike humans, their bones are on the outside and amazingly, they must molt their exo-skeleton to allow them to grow. This process can happen as little as once per year but may happend more frequently when they are young. Once their molt is complete, it appears that their is 2 tarrantulas in the enclosure, so we have to be careful not to remove the real one, just the molt.

 

These tarantulas are nocturnal, arboreal, and quite ant-social, they like to keep to themsielves and only really come out for food. In the wild they will eat anything, including rodents and insects and even eat things that are the same size as themselves.

 

They are quite slender and in the wild they will stick to the bark of trees and the pattern helps them to blend in.

 

Here are some pictures of the new molt.

 

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Cinco de Mayo Everyday at The Reptile Zoo!

 

 

¡Gracias a nuestros muchos seguidores en todo México! Ciudad de México y Guadalajara están en las 10 ciudades para los amantes de Prehistoric Pets! Estamos dedicando este blog para ti! Feliz Cinco de Mayo!

 

 

Here at The Reptile Zoo we love our reptilian friends from Mexico and South America. Many parts of Mexico have a great climate for reptiles with almost 200 native varieties within the country including the common Iguana and Boa.

 

 

We are excited about the timely arrival of our newest addition to The Reptile Zoo a beautiful Gila Monster. We have been keeping a colony of Beaded Lizards at The Reptile Zoo for a little over a year now and we are excited to add their close relative and only other recognized venomous lizard to the ever updating exhibits.

 

 

Both the Gila Monster and Beaded lizard are part of the genus Heloderma which translates to studded skin from the Acient Greek. The unique skin, a key characterstic of these animals, is underlaid with beady scales made from  bony osteoderms. 

 

 

The Heloderma genus includes only these two species with six sub-species all carrying the venemous charactersitics. Unlike snakes their venom glands are located in the lower jaw and can only render the venom by chewing on the predator. Studies conducted using this venom have been found to treat affects of diabetes, Alzheimers, HIV and possibly breast and lung cancer. 

 

 

At The Reptile Zoo we are lucky enough to keep a colony of Beaded Lizards, which means when the breeding season comes we may have BABY Beaded Lizards! Beaded Lizards become mature around 7 years old and females normally lay their eggs between October and December. The size of these clutches can vary  from 2-8 eggs with the babies hatching in the summer of the following year. 

 

 

Thanks for celebrating Cinco de Mayo with us! Hopefully you learned something while still enjoying yourself. If you're ever in the area be sure to stop by The Reptile Zoo to check out our collection of Mexico native reptiles and of course our Beaded Lizards and Gila Monsters!

 

 

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The Fury of Mangrove Snakes!

Hey guys!

This morning has been a super awesome one!  I got to feed my new mangroves last night and set them all up this morning!  I even got a kiss or two from the biggest one of them.  Mangrove snakes are definately my favorite, but I will try with all my might not to overwhelm you all with pictures of them!  They are so gnarly and beautiful!  so, I'm going to promise today only, unless something amazing happens that I just can't resist later.  Not to be outdone, Greg took a big bite from a party burm this morning while he was trying to feed it!  I love it in the mornings when everyone get a bite or two!  It's so much fun!  It doesn't happen very often as we are all very skilled in the Art of Snake... if there is such a thing.  We practice, and practice and train and train so that we are quick witted and agile..... hahahahah...jk

We really all just love our jobs and try to do the best we can in everypart of it, from cleaning the cages,  feeding the lettuce and cricket eaters, to doing the fun stuff like feeding the big snakes and monitors.

What a glamorous job we have!!!!!!!

Here are the mangrove pics from this morning and I will have the bite pics of Greg and the burm in a few secs..........

much love,

xo.........................Savannah

 

 

 

 

 

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