Little Friends of Jack

This past weekend we have been super busy with new and potential new arrivals, from hatching eggs to discovering freshly laid ones.

We were all very excited about the arrival of 9 Arizona Mountain King Snakes early on Saturday morning, and nobody was more excited than long time staffer Craig Tauchman who cares for the native species here in The Reptile Zoo. You can see in the picture below just how much he loves these snakes as he even has a custom made bracelet with the same pattern!

 

The arrival of these snakes gives me the perfect opportunity to talk to you a little bit about Coral Snake patterns vs King Snake patterns. Several non-venomous colubrids have similar red/black/yellow banded patterns to the venomous Coral Snakes. They mimic the Coral Snake’s pattern in an attempt to warn off predators, mimicking other more dangerous species is a common defense mechanism within the reptile world.

A good rhyme to remember to help you to distinguish if it is a venomous Coral snake or a non-venomous Colubrid is;

If red touches black, he’s a friend of Jack, BUT if red touches yellow you’re a dead fellow!

 

Even though this simple rhyme is a great way to help you remember, we recommend that you don’t attempt to pick up any of these snakes in the wild, just in case.

 

 

 

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Hog Wild

 

Love is in the air here at Prehistoric Pets....for the animals anyway.     :-P

Today we discovered our Hognose Snake couple getting very cozy in their home.  Hmmmmmm...

Can't you just feel the love??  Hopefully there will be some little ones on the way VERY soon!!!

How exciting......so WHAT is a Hognose Snake you may ask??

Well, they are a colubrid snake, native to the U.S. and northern Mexico, with a characteristic upturned snout.  This snout serves its purpose as a very handy tool in digging and burrowing through sandy soil.  They are HIGHLY variable in color and pattern, sometimes blotched, sometimes solid...and range in color from red, green, orange, brown, and black.  So how do you tell???  The nose doesn't lie my friends...

When threatened, they actually raise off the ground and hiss, mimicking a cobra.  Sounds like a cool little dude.  The largest species of Hognose Snake can reach almost 6 feet...but most stay relatively small (around 2 feet).  They are rear-fanged, but not techinically venomous.  The saliva is toxic to prey but not dangerous to humans, and they NEVER bite.  How can they be sure?  Experiments have proved that you must smell like their prey to even get a feigned strike.  Nice.

 

So, maybe soon we will have some tiny hognoses running around...but until then come check out the loving couple here at The Reptile Zoo.  See you soon herpers!

 

<3..........................Thalia

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Jurassic Fact of the Week!

Ok, we have another new addition to our information line-up....Jurassic Fact of the Week. Each week we will be posting info on a party animal, a party presenter, or maybe just a party itself. Our goal is to get more information out on how totally completely super awesome our parties are! So, our first fact is about one of our presenters...the cunning Kayla!

Kayla's Fact:

(speaking about her presentations)

"I'm big on education, so I like to bring a boa, a python, and a colubrid. I ask for 3 volunteers, and have each kid hold a snake, then teach them the differences between the families."

How cool! Kayla, keep up the awesome work!
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